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  1. Chimpanzee Fight For Survival
    17 Oct, 2019
    Chimpanzee Fight For Survival
    Millions chimpanzees once thrived in the forests of 25 different African nations. Today, their populations have been reduced to only 5 nations and their numbers have plummeted to between 150,000 and 300,000. Without immediate action, humans' closest living relative could be lost in only 15 years. Humans are largely responsible for chimpanzee population declines. In addition to poaching, which plagues areas of Africa, deforesting and farming are quickly eliminating the habitats of chimps. Legal
  2. Prairie Grasslands: Lungs Of A Nation
    17 Oct, 2019
    Prairie Grasslands: Lungs Of A Nation
    No other ecosystem in America removes as much carbon from the atmosphere as prairie grasslands. Some carbon that is produced by our giant industrial complex is recycled into the fertile soils that have become a breadbasket for the entire world. The rolling acres of grassland stretching across the center of the United States are a classic American image. Early European settlers of this eco-region were so impressed by these endless grasslands that they compared them to the ocean, and named their
  3. Grassland Ducks
    03 Oct, 2019
    Grassland Ducks
    The prairie grasslands ecoregion is often referred to as a “duck factory” because it produces roughly 50% of America’s ducks even though it occupies only about 10% of total duck breeding territory. Duck species such as northern pintails and mallards form mating pairs and breed in the scattered wetlands of this region. Ducks seem to prefer the smaller wetlands because the isolated ponds allow each pair to have its own space. In fact, ducks already inhabiting a small pond may chase away other
  4. 20 Sep, 2019
    Wildlife Sales Fueling Corruption, Terrorism, Wars
    The trafficking of wildlife and their products is one of the most profitable and attractive of all the illicit trades, possibly surpassed only by the trafficking of arms and drugs. Studies note that several of the most notorious armed insurgent groups and terrorist organizations now derive substantial profits from the illegal wildlife trade to fund their incursions, civil wars, and other acts of violence. Criminal organizations are systematically exploiting wildlife as a source of financing.
  5. Litter Hurts Critters
    20 Sep, 2019
    Litter Hurts Critters
    Humans dispose of trillions of tons of garbage every year. The average person in a developed country produces about 2.6 pounds of garbage every single day. Landfills take in most of this garbage, while a substantial amount of litter finds its way into the natural environment. Tens of thousands of cans and bottles are thrown out of moving vehicles everyday. An enormous amounts of waste is left behind on beaches, parks and river banks. One clean-up drive alone along a US coastline collected over
  6. Bringing Tigers Back From The Brink
    03 Sep, 2019
    Bringing Tigers Back From The Brink
    There were almost 100,000 tigers roaming the wilds of the planet in the early 1900's. The drastic fall in the population of this magnificent beast to just a few thousands within the span of a century tells a lot about human callousness and cruelty towards wildlife. Until a couple of decades ago, the tiger was killed purely for sport, especially in India. The times of the maharajahs abound with folklore of how these unfortunate animals were hunted down and showcased in village squares,
  7. What Is A Wetland?
    03 Sep, 2019
    What Is A Wetland?
    A wetland is an area of land that is saturated with water. There are many different kinds of wetlands and many ways to categorize them. Wetlands generally fall into five general types: marine (ocean), estuarine (estuary), riverine (river), lacustrine (lake), and palustrine (marsh). Common names for wetlands include marshes, estuaries, mangroves, mudflats, mires, ponds, fens, swamps, deltas, coral reefs, billabongs, lagoons, shallow seas, bogs, lakes, and floodplains, to name just a few!
  8. Habitat Destruction
    26 Aug, 2019
    Habitat Destruction
    Habitat destruction is the process in which natural habitat is rendered unable to support the species present. In this process, the plants and animals which previously used the site are displaced or destroyed, reducing biodiversity. Habitat destruction by human activity is mainly for the purpose of harvesting natural resources for industry production and urbanization. Clearing habitats for agriculture is the principal cause of habitat destruction. Other important causes of habitat destruction
  9. What Are Kelp Forests?
    26 Aug, 2019
    What Are Kelp Forests?
    Kelp forests grow predominantly on the Pacific Coast, from Alaska and Canada to the waters of Baja California. Tiered like a terrestrial rainforest with a canopy and several layers below, the kelp forests of the eastern Pacific coast are dominated by two canopy-forming, brown macroalgae species, giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) and bull kelp (Nereocystis leutkeana). Conditions Required for Growth Kelp forests grow along rocky coastlines in depths of about 2 m to more than 30 m (6 to 90+ ft).
  10. Rhinos: Ancient Animals At Risk
    26 Aug, 2019
    Rhinos: Ancient Animals At Risk
    The rhino is one of the largest and most powerful animals on earth, and one of the most ancient. Its origins can be traced back 50 million years when it was know as Paraceratherium, the giant rhinoceros. This monstrous creature weighed nearly 20 tons and roamed the grasslands that ranged from Europe to China. It survived the ravages of the Ice Age, migrated continents, fought against predatory adversaries like the crocodile and prehistoric hyenas, and evolved into what we know as the present day
  11. Hunting Is Killing Off Mammal & Bird Populations
    17 Aug, 2019
    Hunting Is Killing Off Mammal & Bird Populations
    Hunting is a major threat to wildlife, particularly in tropical regions. An international team of ecologists and environmental scientists have found that bird and mammal populations are reduced within 7 and 40 km of hunters' access points, such as roads and settlements. Within these impact zones, mammal populations decline on average by 83%, and bird populations by 58%. Additionally, commercial hunting has a higher impact than hunting for family food, and hunting pressure is higher in areas
  12. Saving Species
    17 Aug, 2019
    Saving Species
    Wildlife preservation is informed management of the natural environment to protect and benefit plants and animals. Extinction may occur due to natural causes. However, the actions of people and the growth of human population have all too quickly created a threat to the well being of wildlife. There have been declines in the numbers of some species and extinction of others. The need for conservation was created by human beings. About 2 million years ago, when Homo sapiens first appeared on the
  13. Forests
    17 Aug, 2019
    Forests
    Forest biomes are dominated by trees and extend over one-third of the earth's land surface. There are three main types of forests—temperate, tropical and boreal. Each type has a different assortment of animals, climate characteristics and species compositions. ●  Temperate forests are in temperate regions of the earth including North America, Europe and Asia. They have four well-defined seasons and a growing season between 140 and 200 days. Rainfall takes place throughout the year and soils are
  14. Penguins Face An Uncertain Future
    17 Aug, 2019
    Penguins Face An Uncertain Future
    Penguins waddle around in ungainly fashion on ground, but once in water they transform into expert swimmers and can cruise at speeds of 15 miles per hour. Although the penguin is a bird species, they are unable to fly because they have flippers instead of wings. The penguin's black body and white belly is an excellent aquatic camouflage when it sets out to hunt for food, which mainly consists of fish, crabs, squid and shrimps. Penguins are essentially an inhabitant of the Southern Hemisphere
  15. 12 Aug, 2019
    Species On Four Continents Threatened By Palm Oil Expansion
    As palm oil production expands from Southeast Asia into tropical regions of the Americas and Africa, vulnerable forests and species on four continents now face increased risk of loss. The largest areas of vulnerable forest are in Africa and South America, where more than 30 percent of forests within land suitable for oil palm plantations remain unprotected, according to a Duke University study. Rates of recent deforestation have been highest in Southeast Asia and South America, particularly
  16. 12 Aug, 2019
    Brace Yourself For A New Wave Of Biological Invasions
    We are all becoming increasingly familiar with the impacts of invasive species. Knotweed from Japan can destroy building foundations, zebra mussels from eastern Europe can clog-up drinking water pipes, and an Asian fungus is causing ash tree die-back in our forests. Our rapidly changing world will bring new types of invaders, often from very unexpected places. Invasive non-native species are among the greatest drivers of biodiversity loss on the planet. An international team of scientists
  17. Leopards Have Lost 75% Of Their Range
    12 Aug, 2019
    Leopards Have Lost 75% Of Their Range
    The leopard (Panthera pardus), one of the world’s most iconic big cats, has lost as much as 75 percent of its historic range. Animal agriculture, as well as illegal trade in leopard skins and parts and legal trophy hunting, are having a devastating effect on leopards. Recent research challenges the conventional assumption in many areas that leopards remain relatively abundant and not seriously threatened. The leopard is a famously elusive animal, which is likely why it has taken so long to
  18. Coral Reefs: Rainforest Of The Sea
    12 Aug, 2019
    Coral Reefs: Rainforest Of The Sea
    Coral reefs, rainforest of the sea, are one of nature's most remarkable creations - teaming with thousands of unique and valuable plants and animals. More than one-quarter of all marine species depend on coral reefs for their survival. Humans depend on the survival of coral reefs too. Coral reefs provide a natural wave barrier which protects beaches and coastlines from storms and floods. Coral reefs have existed on our planet for over 50 million years, but recently we have lost over 20% of the
  19. Backyard Birding
    12 Aug, 2019
    Backyard Birding
    Watching the many species of birds that inhabit your ecosystem is a fun and fascinating pastime the whole family can enjoy together. Winter is the best time to feed birds as they need the food more than at any other time of year and you will typically see a greater number and variety of birds at bird feeders. Many interesting birds from the north fly south in winter, and in spring many species return home from lands in the south, providing a great variety of species to see. You don’t need to
  20. Dealing With Woodchucks
    12 Aug, 2019
    Dealing With Woodchucks
    Woodchucks are harmless, comical vegetarians who are commonly sighted in suburban backyards and along roadways. Conflicts usually arise over who gets to eat the garden vegetables. Suburban landscapes provide perfect habitat for woodchucks. Our raised decks provide cover and a perfect place to raise young, and our lush lawns provide a virtual buffet. Most woodchuck conflicts occur in spring and summer, just when birthing season has begun. That's why problems need to be solved in a way that

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Wild Earth Facts

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Join World Animal Foundation

Around the world, individuals, groups and organizations are making a difference for animals and the planet every day. From saving a companion animal from cruelty, to saving an entire species from extinction, simple choices and actions that you can make will help save animals and the earth.

You can make a difference for animals by adopting an animal, recycling, choosing humane products, donating to a charity of your choice, distributing flyers and fact sheets, encouraging humane legislation, planting wildlife gardens, trapping and neutering feral cats, volunteering, and educating others about earth and animal issues.

Together, our collective efforts to protect and preserve animals and the environment is making a difference. Join the effort today; become an earth and animal advocate.

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